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Marathon Ashland Petroleum (3165), Garyville

Releases in 2012

LDEQ Accident Number
Accident Date
Point Source/Release CauseNotes
145377

2012-12-15
Point Source(s):
South Flare
Unit 59 South Flare

Pollutant(s):
Water - BRQ
Nitrous Oxide - 7 pounds
Compressed Flammable Gas - 1,336 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 385 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 2,095 pounds
Sulfur Dioxide - 122 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 1,574 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 42 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 42 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 10 pounds
Hydrogen Sulfide - 395 pounds
Methane - 894 pounds
Ethane - 6 pounds
Ethylene - 840 pounds
Propane - 4 pounds
Propylene - 4 pounds
n-Butane - 264 pounds
Isobutane - 264 pounds
n-Pentane - 2 pounds
T-butene2 - 3 pounds
cis-2-Butene - 167 pounds
Pentene Plus - 5,674 pounds
Carbon Dioxide - 5,660 pounds
Hydrogen - 1,255 pounds
Nitrogen - 126 pounds
Oxygen - 6 pounds
Compressed Flammable Liquid - 11 pounds
Isopentane - 6 pounds
n-Hexane - 952 pounds
Ammonia - 7 pounds
Cause of Problem: Piping or Tubing

A tube leaked on the Unit 15 Hot Separator Overhead Fin Fans at 17:52 hours. At 18:00, the unit was undergoing emergency shutdown procedures and the U15 dump valve was opened to the flare. The incident was a Gas Oil leak in the Unit 15 Hot separator Overhead Fin Fan Exchangers. This leak caused a vapor release of hydrocarbons and hydrogen in addition to a small amount of hydrogen sulfide.
PDF was too large to upload. Unit 15 was depressurized to the South Flare to safely isolate the leaking Overhead Fin Fan. Once the unit pressure was sufficiently low in the unit, the Fin Fans were isolated and the leak stopped. An incident investigation will result in recommendations to prevent recurrence. The reportable quantities for hydrogen sulfide, compressed flammable gas, and compressed flammable liquid were exceeded during this event. A report on October 9, 2013, removed greenhouse gas emissions and revised the estimate of VOC emissions.
144469

2012-11-06
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 North Flare

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 45 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 6 pounds
Cause of Problem: Process Upset

A unit upset occurred in the Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Unit (FCCU) due to a sudden shift in feed composition. Subsequently, pressure increased in the fractionator overhead accumulator causing the pressure control valve to open to the refinery's North Flare for 11 minutes.
144322

2012-10-30
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 South Flare

Pollutant(s):
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 123 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 36 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 127 pounds
Propylene - BRQ
Cause of Problem: Under Investigation

On October 30, 2012, at 15:20 hours, a propylene rail car was lined up to the flare during unloading process. A Root Cause Analysis is being conducted to determine the exact cause of this incident.
Products Control personnel closed flare line leading from propylene unloading racks to the flare header system. Incident investigation will result in recommendation items designed to prevent recurrence. The reportable quantity for Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) was exceeded during the 24 hour period. An incident investigation was conducted to determine the cause or causes of the incident. Per this investigation, the root cause was identified as the procedures were followed incorrectly. The SGS operator misaligned the valve line-up and allowed propylene to offload to the flare. The two recommendations (actions) from the investigation were 1) review and reinforce to personnel the importance of following Operating Guidelines while performing all shift duties- completed 2/18/13; and 2) add proper valve alignment to railcar checklist- completed on 2/20/13.
143781

2012-10-12
Point Source(s):

Unit 59 North Flare

Pollutant(s):
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 2,223 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds - 105 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 275 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 1,497 pounds
Sulfur Dioxide - 260 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 5,133 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 30 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 30 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 123 pounds
Benzene - 15 pounds
Hydrogen Sulfide - 1 pounds
Butane - 5 pounds
n-Butane - 74 pounds
Isobutane - 14 pounds
Pentane - 256 pounds
n-Pentane - 143 pounds
Pentene Plus - 727 pounds
Cyclohexane - 3 pounds
n-Hexane - 20 pounds
Toluene - 41 pounds
Propane - 31 pounds
T-butene2 - 11 pounds
Methane - 61 pounds
Ethane - 29 pounds
Ethylene - 3 pounds
Propylene - 6 pounds
1-Butene - 8 pounds
Carbon Dioxide - 2 pounds
Hydrogen - 16 pounds
Nitrogen - 20 pounds
Oxygen - 0 pounds
Cause of Problem: Other - See text

The initiating incident was a pump seal fire in the Gasoline Desulfurization Unit (Unit 55). The fire was fueled by a leaking seal on the pump. Extinguishing the fire was delayed by inability to close an EIV on the suction side of the pump. This resulted in emergency shutdown of the unit. Two other events also occurred on this day including an upset in Sulfur Plant Unit 234 and a flame-out of the North Flare. Due to the fire and emergency shutdown of the Gasoline Desulfurization Unit, the Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit cut feed, sending vent gas to the North Flare. Process vent gas was sent to the North Flare which increased the steam to the flare suddenly, snuffing the flare out.
PDF too large to upload (109 pages) To re-light the North Flare, steam was gradually decreased and natural gas was added to the flare gas to allow the two available igniters to relight the North Flare. Parts to repair the North Flare pilot system were already on order when this incident occurred. The North Flare was taken out of service when the parts were received and repaired on October 31, 2012. Spare pilot and igniter assemblies are now in stock so that repairs can be made in a timely fashion if an incident like this is to occur again. Total amount of pollutants released was 59438.44 lbs, but 90% was claimed to be efficiently burned off, resulting in 5943.59 lbs that were actually released. The reportable quantity for Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) (100 pounds) was exceeded during the 24 hour period.
143319

2012-09-23
Point Source(s):
Emissions from Flare
emissions from flare and Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer

Pollutant(s):
Nitric Oxide - 0 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 1 pounds
Sulfur Dioxide - 91 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 1 pounds
Hydrogen Sulfide - 0 pounds
Methane - 0 pounds
Ethane - 0 pounds
n-Butane - 0 pounds
n-Pentane - 0 pounds
1-Pentene - 0 pounds
Pentene Plus - 0 pounds
Natural Gas - 28,000 pounds
n-Hexane - BRQ
Hydrogen - BRQ
Particulate Matter 10 - BRQ
Particulate Matter 2.5 - BRQ
Propane - 1 pounds
Isobutane - 0 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

Marathon experienced a partial power outage caused by a malfunctioning substation in the refinery resulted in multiple pieces of equipment in the refinery losing power. Low pressure stripper Offgas flared in the South Flare due to partial power outage. Enterprise incident due to a plant farther downstream that had uncharacteristically ceased operation due to an upset condition. The pressure safety valve, as designed, released discharging natural gas to atmosphere due to high pressure on the pipeline caused by the upset condition farther down the line. Emission points involved were the Unit 59 North Flare and the Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer.
Marathon power was restored and the equipment that was shutdown was restarted to minimize further releases. An incident investigation will result in recommendation items designed to prevent the recurrence of this event. High sulfur dioxide from one of the thermal oxidizer stacks in Unit 45 and in addition to a small amount of Unit 15 low pressure stripper offgas was flared which contains a small amount of hydrogen sulfide which is converted to sulfur dioxide in the North Flare. Emission points involved were the Unit 59 North Flare and the Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer. Enterprise personnel immediately began the process of taking the plant down in order to end the release event. Amount of natural gas released is above reportable quantity.
No LDEQ Number Available

2012-09-11
Point Source(s):
N/A

Pollutant(s):
Gasoline - 5 gallons
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

The pumps on the in-ground sump failed to operate
An oily water sewer in-ground sump located in the MPC tank farm near the gasoline blending building was observed to be overflowing oily water onto the ground. The breaker of pump 67-1567-01 was reset and the breaker of pump 67-1567-02 was repaired. The contaminated soil was removed from around the sump.
142789

2012-09-06
Point Source(s):
Unit 259 North Ground Flare (EQT #282 EIQ #20A-08)

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 896 pounds
Cause of Problem: No Information Given

The U205 coker 1202 drum pressured up causing a corresponding pressure build up in the blow down system. The drum experienced a "refoaming event" where steam is introduced into the drum immediately following a drum swap causing the partial pressure of the unconverted material in the drum to drop. This resulted in over pressuring the fractionator. Pressure relief valves 205-P1511(V1) and 205-P1511(V2) then opened to the North Ground Flare.
Initial report states that the charge rate to the unit was immediately reduced, but that no specific remedial actions were taken or planned at that time. Follow up report states that a TapRoot Investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the incident. This investigation found that the causal factors were: 1) the drum inlet temperature was too low for the cycle and 2) after the drum swap, the valve ramp program pinched the combined overhead valve to 40% and the throttling of this valve contributed to the overpressure of the drums. The investigation recommended: 1) Implement a low drum inlet temperature alarm on both Coke Drums, 2) Develop a drum inlet temperature controller to allow operations to fire the heater based on drum inlet temperature, and 3) Evaluate removing the combined overhead valve ramp down program after a drum swap. Recommendations 1 and 2 were completed by 11/15/2012. Recommendation 3 was not completed.
No LDEQ Number Available

2012-08-29
Point Source(s):
oil spill response boat (LA 1409 FG - The Big Tuna)

Pollutant(s):
Gasoline - 10 gallons
Cause of Problem: Weather

Marathon's oil spill response boat (LA 1409 FG - The Big Tuna), located at Dock 1, was found to be submerged on August 29, 2012 during Hurricane Isaac. This is likely due to the eight-foot surge that occurred on the Mississippi River during the hurricane. The boat was removed from the river on August 30, 2012 - at that time it was noted that approximately 10 gallons of gasoline had been lost from the fuel tank while the boat was submerged in the river.
As soon as conditions allowed, the boat was removed from the Mississippi River. The facility claims this release exceeds Reportable Quantities for oil. This is actually below Louisiana DEQ reportable quantities, but there is an inconsistency in facility's notion of RQ for oil and the actual state of Louisiana (LDEQ) RQs. There is no LDEQ incident # for this event, although this is linked to National Response Center NRC incident # 102-2780.
142430-142532

2012-08-28
Point Source(s):
flare
outfall 002

Pollutant(s):
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds - 194 pounds
Pentene Plus - 82 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 81 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 81 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 6,843 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 4,016 pounds
NOx - 738 pounds
Process Wastewater - 12,600,000 gallons
Methane - 159 pounds
Ethane - 93 pounds
Ethylene - 18 pounds
Propane - 5,667 pounds
Propylene - 175 pounds
n-Butane - 81 pounds
Isobutane - 169 pounds
1-Butene - 119 pounds
T-butene2 - 73 pounds
cis-2-Butene - 55 pounds
Pentane - 369 pounds
1,3-Butadiene - 2 pounds
Hydrogen - 132 pounds
Carbon Dioxide - 10,852 pounds
Nitrogen - 36 pounds
Nitrous Oxide - 14 pounds
Cause of Problem: Weather

There were multiple units that experienced upsets during the shutdown and startup activities surrounding Hurricane Isaac: In preparation for Hurricane Isaac, the refinery units were at minimum rates anticipating a shutdown condition. As a result of these abnormal conditions, the refinery 150 PSIG steam header pressure was significantly low. The U205 Delayed Coker unit uses steam to purge resid and coke from the switch valve and ball valves on the coke drum structure. the low steam pressure ultimately led to the valve failing due to coke build up on the valve. On 8/28/2012 the unit was forced to go on bypass and internal circulation due to inability to switch feed to the offline drum. After the unit was on bypass the Wet Gas Compressor tripped three times. These trips resulted in releases to the flare. This resulted in a small amount of hydrocarbon material to be routed to the ground flare. Propane Flaring: Due to atypical operating conditions and the shutdown of our third-party propane pipeline, MPC flared propane starting on August 31 at 06:52 AM intermittently until September 1 at 02:45 AM. The flaring of propane was required to balance refinery operations. No reportable quantities were exceeded. The release calculations are provided in Attachment 4. North Stick Flare Flame Outage: On September 1, the North Stick Flare flame was snuffed out with steam for a total of five minutes. This occurred while decreasing the amount of propane flaring mentioned above. No reportable quantities were exceeded. This event was reported verbally on September 1st and a follow-up written report was submitted on September 7, 2012 (see Attachment 5). North Stick Flare Damage: The North Stick Flare was observed to have some abnormal flame patterns prior to Hurricane Isaac. However, during the hurricane it was noticed that one side of the flare tip had more significant flames. After the hurricane on September 11 th an inspection, via a remote helicopter, observed that a natural gas supply line to the pilots had a broken union. This was causing natural gas to burn just below the flare tip. It is believed that the high winds experienced during the hurricane caused the union to completely break apart. A repair plan is being formulated to correct this issue. Wastewater Discharge: MPC discharged untreated process area stormwater via Outfall 002 to the Lake Maurepas drainage system beginning on August 30, 2012 at 07:00 hrs intermittently until September 3, 2012 at 13:00 hrs. The amount of wastewater discharged is estimated to be 300,000 bbls (which is 12,600,000 gallons). Samples were collected prior to the discharge and after the start of discharge to verify that the water being discharged was sufficient quality to ensure no harm to environment. The discharge was monitored to ensure that there was no sheen on the water discharged off-site. It should be noted that prior to discharging the untreated process area stormwater, MPC had reached the on-site WWTP storage capacity of 619,995 bbls of water. In addition, MPC placed an out of service crude oil tank (500-2) back into service prior to the hurricane specifically to be used for wastewater and slop oil storage as needed. This tank was used for excess water storage prior to any wastewater being discharged off-site.
This report is linked to two LDEQ incident numbers: 142430 and 142532. Unit 205 Coker sent to the North Ground Flare. The release was identified at approximately 06:35 hours on August 29. 2012 and lasted for approximately 1944 minutes (1d 8h 24m). The compound of concern was Propylene. Totals of 76.54 lbs and 86.15 lbs were released during the 2 24-hour periods involved. MPC considers these emissions to be covered under the temporary variance issued on August 27 of 2012. That variance authorized the temporary permit for the emissions: Sulfur Dioxide 13.3 tons; Nitrogen Oxide 0.9 tons; Carbon Monoxide 7.03 tons; Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 8.51 tons; Hydrogen Sulfide 0.73 tons. There was also a variance for 3,750 long tons(8,400,000lbs) of sulfur to be stored on a "sulfur pad". These variances were considered the maximum allowed during that period, therefore they are not included in LABB pollutant totals in this report. As soon as conditions allowed, the compressor was restarted. Missed Monitoring/Repair/Inspections Due to the hurricane, personnel were not available to complete several regulatory required tasks, such as weekly inspections, PMs, monitoring, and repairs. The programs and the specific missed requirements are listed below: LDAR Program 5-day first attempt at repair requirement (five components) 15-day final repair requirement (twelve components) Waste Program Weekly satellite collection area inspection (two locations) Weekly hazardous waste storage area inspection Weekly non-hazardous waste storage area inspection Weekly universal waste area inspection Weekly used oil storage area inspection Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program Weekly refinery inspection Spill Prevention Control & Countermeasures Program Weekly inspection of the Contractor Village area MACT II - NSPS Subpart UUU Weekly PM for the pH meter used for compliance demonstration Benzene Waste Operation NESHAP Carbon Canister monitoring for breakthrough (eight events) 15-day repair requirement (four sumps) There is a separate report on this database for the sinking of the "Big Tuna" response boat. Response Boat Fuel Loss: The oil spill response boat became submerged in the Mississippi River on August 29th, due to a surge in the river level which resulted in the loss of ten gallons of gasoline. The reportable quantity for oil was exceeded. This event was reported verbally on August 31 and a written follow-up report was submitted on September 7, 2012 (See Attachment 3). (Attachment 3 was deleted from this file, and added to the report for this event)
141908

2012-08-08
Point Source(s):
RBS Flare

Pollutant(s):
Propane - 0 pounds
n-Butane - 1 pounds
Isobutane - 2 pounds
1-Butene - 1 pounds
Isobutylene - 1 pounds
T-butene2 - 1 pounds
cis-2-Butene - 1 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 0 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 3 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 0 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 0 pounds
1-Pentene - BRQ
1,3-Butadiene - BRQ
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 7 pounds
Cause of Problem: Instrument Failure

False reading on the 66LT0511 level controller caused the two NC4 compressors to trip. The high pressure on the receiver, due to high liquid level, caused the 66PC0507 valve on the receiver to open the RBS flare. Approximately 6.67 lbs of VOCs were released as a result.
The operator blew down transmitter 66LT0511 and opened the bypass valve on the receiver to send the liquid back to the RBS tank. The faulty level transmitter was taken out of service and repaired.
141597

2012-07-27
Point Source(s):
unit 34, thermal oxidizer

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 640 pounds
Cause of Problem: Under Investigation

An investigation is underway to determine the cause of the incident. False reading on a flow transmitter. Following the shutdown, feed increased to Unit 34 and shutdown the oxygen skid. This resulted in high sulfur dioxide and visible emission from the U34 thermal oxidizer.
The refinery's ambient air monitoring station data did not exceed the NAAQs for Sulfur dioxide. The refinery's Air Monitoring team was dispatched to monitor the community downwind of the incident. There were no other known off-site impacts. The Unit 234 was restarted. Maintenance steamed out the flow transmitter with the faulty reading. U34 oxygen skid was restarted. Specific remedial action unknown at this time; an incident investigation will result in recommendation items designed to prevent the recurrence of this event. They admitted to releasing 416.69 lbs more than their permitted maximum for sulfur dioxide. The total sulfur dioxide released was actually 639.64 lbs. The facility claimed that the reportable quantity for sulfur dioxide was not exceeded, however, the opacity limit from the thermal oxidizer was exceeded.
141553

2012-07-26
Point Source(s):
oily water sewer junction box

Pollutant(s):
Crude Oil - 378 gallons
Cause of Problem: Under Investigation

The release occurred eastern perimeter of the Unit 222 Saturates Gas Unit. Discharge discovered during an inspection of the stormwater sewer system. Excavation in the area determined the source of oil to be a leaking oily water sewer (OWS) junction box.
The leaking OWS junction box was isolated on July 31, 2012. Excavation activities to remove contaminated soil into 55-gallon drums and roll-off boxes were ongoing during time of the report. The excavated material was to be tested and properly disposed of at a permitted facility. Marathon claimed that they would collect soil samples under completion of the removal of contaminated soil and those samples would be analyzed to verify that the soil meets the allowable levels set forth in LDEQs Risk Evaluation/Corrective Action Program (RECAP) document. Any subsequent recommendations were to be implemented to prevent reoccurrence of the incident upon completion of the investigation. LABB was unable to find the LDEQ verbal report or original SPOC report. They claimed the release was less than 10 barrels so we estimated the release to be 9 barrels, which is 378 gallons.
140561

2012-06-16
Point Source(s):
Flange on the Pitch Exchanger 210-1317-08
North Ground Flare

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 309 pounds
Crude Oil - 5 gallons
Hydrogen Sulfide - 1 pounds
Nitric Oxide - 1 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 5 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 10 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 0 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 0 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 0 pounds
Compressed Flammable Gas - 10 pounds
Flammable Liquid - 0 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

The 210-1513-01 Vacuum Bottoms Pump inboard and outboard motor bearing housings were smoking during routine observations. The 210-1513-02 Vacuum Bottoms Pump (back-up) was already out of service for repairs. The board operator was notified and started reducing Crude charge rate. The 210-1513-01 Vacuum Bottoms pump was shut down due to the outboard motor bearing igniting. The 210 Crude Unit shutdown procedure was initiated. The 210-1801-01 Offgas Compressor tripped due to a high level in the 210-1202 Compressor Suction Drum. Both pumps were already on in automatic. The outsider operator opened the bypass around the flow controller to the Product Receiver. Crude overhead gas was flared in the North Ground Flare. About 5 gallons of crude oil from a flange on the Refinery's Oily Water Sewer and processed in the WWTP.
The boardman cut charge rates to Crude Unit 10 and shut down Crude Unit 210. Both Compressor Suction Drum pumps were turned on, and the bypass around the flow controller was opened. The operator increased the suction drum pressure to assist the pumps in pressuring out the level to the startup compressor. The incident investigation will result in recommendation items designed to prevent the recurrence of this event. Initial report states material did go offsite. Verbal report and Hazardous Materials Incident Reporting Form state that H2S was released (and incorrectly reporting that the reportable quantity for it is 500 lbs), while the refinery statement letter reports only SO2.
138329

2012-03-25
Point Source(s):
RBS Flare

Pollutant(s):
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 1 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 10 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 53 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 139 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 1 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 1 pounds
Cause of Problem: Process Upset

The pressure safety valve for Tank 250-2 had opened, so the operator blocked in the PSV.
No offsite impact was associated with the event.
138219

2012-03-22
Point Source(s):
Unit 20 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 34 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 220 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 234 Thermal Oxidizer, and all process heaters that combust refinery fuel gas.

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 73,200 pounds
Cause of Problem: Process Upset

Chain of Events: While placing amine filters in service, an upset occurred in the Unit 247 Amine Regeneration Unit Overhead Receiver. A high liquid level in the Receiver caused liquid to be sent to the Sulfur Plants. The Unit 220 and 234 Sulfur Plants shut down due to high knockout drum levels. This caused an elevated flow to the remaining operational sulfur plants. The Unit 34 Sulfur Plant then shutdown due to low boiler feed water level in the Reaction Furnace. Unit 247's lean amine became saturated as a result of the high acid gas header pressure, resulting in less than adequate hydrogen sulfide absorption in RFG producing units, causing both Refinery Fuel Gas Mix Drums to experience high levels of hydrogen sulfide. This fuel gas was then combusted in all the refinery's heaters that were operating on refinery fuel gas. Summary: An upset in the Unit 247 Amine Regeneration Unit caused an opacity exceedance and sulfur dioxide reportable quantity exceedance in the Sulfur Plants and at all the process heaters, which combust refinery fuel gas. MPC originally reported that the upset began in the Coker Unit, but, after further investigation, stated that the Coker Unit was not involved in the incident.
Process unit charge rates were reduced in accordance with the refinery's sulfur shedding plan. Sulfur plants were re-started as soon as possible in order to convert more hydrogen sulfide to sulfur. The refinery dispatched 3 Air Monitoring Teams, and no pollutants were detected at the fenceline. The Air Monitoring Team data is attached to the report. Mobile SO2 meter was post calibration expiration. (AreaRAE #240) Corrective actions given in follow-up report: Review and reinforce procedure use with 552 Board Operator, Issues Lessons Learned to emphasize the requirement and importance of using procedures, Review and reinforce procedure use with 532 Operator, Investigate a means to maintain LP BFW header supply while spare LP BFW is out-of-service, Investigate upgrading U220/U234 Amine Acid Gas KO Drum Pumps from 25 gpm max to 50 gpm max, Train 001 shift supervisors on the updated refinery sulfur shedding procedure and importance of following the procedure to emliminate a large sulfur dioxide emissions incident, Update Unite 232/247 Carbon After Filter Change-out Procedure to utilize FC0051 to help ensure that a surge of flow cannot be routed to Regenerator during the filter start-up, Update DCS graphics to clean-up the FC0051 split-range control and PC0021 selector control schematic to help improve operator understanding, Provide face-to-face training on the updated procedure and schematics for each Board Operator, and Update refinery sulfur shedding procedure such that unit charge rates are reduced quickly enough to minimize sulfur dioxide emissions during sulfur unit shutdowns.
137652

2012-03-05
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 North Flare

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 1,257 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 355 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

The incident that occurred was a unit shutdown and associated flaring event. The wet gas compressor in the Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Unit tripped offline followed by an entire unit shutdown. The shutdown caused hydrocarbons to be routed to the north flare.
RQs exceeded for SO2 and HRVOCs. Also, the opacity standard was exceeded for 8 minutes. Incident only lasted 26 minutes, but the depressuring of the unit continued and flaring lasted approximately 425 minutes. Remediations included cleaning the wet gas compressor motor aux contact and retest to verify appropriate resistance, and also revised compressor control system programming to include motor current to improve reliability of failed-to-start interlock logic.
No LDEQ Number Available

2012-02-22
Point Source(s):
Unit 46, Propylene Splitter

Pollutant(s):
Propylene - 65 pounds
Propane - 3 pounds
Cause of Problem: Seal or Gasket

A fire occurred when residual material in a line was ignited during the removal of a valve. Vented into atmosphere and fire associated. NO LDEQ Incident #, no LDEQ report. Agent reached was Rachel Mroch and no # assigned. Propane not included in the output values and the date on the second attachment precedes the event.
Personnel in the area used fire extinguishers to put out the fire. Blinds were installed on the line to contain the material leaking by the block valve. There is no SPOC report and no LDEQ report attached to this file.
No LDEQ Number Available

2012-02-22
Point Source(s):
unit 46, propylene splitter

Pollutant(s):
Propylene - 65 pounds
Cause of Problem: Maintenance/Procedures

fire occurred when residual material in a line was ignited during the removal of a valve
Personnel in the area used fire extinguishers to put out the fire. Blinds were installed on the line to contain the material leaking by the block valve. There was a subsequent release of propylene after the initial release that was not known at the time of the verbal report with a combined quantity of 65 lbs.
137244

2012-02-16
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 South Flare (EQT0160, EIQ69-74)

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 1,359 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

During an upset of the U15 High Pressure Stripper, liquid and vapor were sent to the 19-1211 Fuel Gas Absorber KO Drum. A control valve and a bypass were opened on the bottom of the drum, sending liquid to the flare in order to maintain level in the drum.
In U15, HP Stripping Steam was cut and charge was reduced to bring the upset under control.
137197

2012-02-15
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 South Flare

Pollutant(s):
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 5 pounds
Nitrogen Dioxide - 1 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 5 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 0 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 0 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - BRQ
Cause of Problem: Power Failure

A compressor in Unit 12 (Platformer) experienced a loss of power which caused the compressor to shut down and pressure up. A pressure relief valve opened on the compressor and caused hydrogen to be routed to the South Flare.
Operations restarted the compressor and returned to normal operations. The incident investigation will result in recommendation items designed to prevent the recurrence of this event. There were no known off-site impacts.
137057

2012-02-08
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 North Flare

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 2,581 pounds
Nitrogen Oxide - 9 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 50 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 82 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 1 pounds
Particulate Matter 2.5 - 1 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds - 8 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Design

A root cause analysis is being conducted to determine why this incident occurred. The Louisiana Refining Division's Investigative Summary Report states that the initiating event was the troubleshooting common alarm on the Bently Nevada radial vibration proximitor card to include a module self-test for diagnostic information.
Operations restarted the Wet Gas Compressor. The root cause analysis will result in recommendation items designed to prevent the recurrence of this event. The refinery stated that lessons learned included: On a Bently Nevada 3500 system, a module self-test or replacement will cause the output signal to go to 0ma. If the output signal is wired to a Triconex system, it will report the transmitter as being an unreliable signal (bad transmitter of bad pv). VOC chemical breakdown is provided. Only the RQ for SO2 was exceeded during this release.
137050

2012-02-07
Point Source(s):
Unit 63 Tank Farm

Pollutant(s):
Crude Oil - 42 gallons
Cause of Problem: Under Investigation

The product inside the Unit 210 Crude Charge Pump caught fire due to a seal failure. While extinguishing the fire with fire water, some product spilled to the concrete containment around the tank. An incident investigation is being conducted to determine the root cause of the incident. 6-10 bbl of crude oil burned in the tank in addition to one bbl of oil released.
The pump suction and discharge were blocked in to stop the flow. The Shift Emergency Response Team (SERT) responded and extinguished the fire. A vacuum truck removed the spilled product. The oil was to be reprocessed, and the water would be treated in the waste water treatment plant. The incident investigation will result in recommendation items to prevent the recurrence of this event. There was no medical attention necessary for the exposed individuals.
136998

2012-02-06
Point Source(s):


Pollutant(s):
Naptha (Crude) - 847 pounds
Cause of Problem: Piping or Tubing

On February 6, 2012, a pipe failed at the Unit 215 Hydrocracker Franctionator Top Pumparound circuit that resulted in a release and flaring event. The pressure safety valve on the U15 Fractionator Top Pumparound Pump opened prematurely due to debris in the pipe. The vibration from the psv relief caused a failure at a weld on the discharge line from the pump. Heavy naphtha was released for approximately 10 minutes. The root cause was identified as Work Direction/Supervision During Work - No Supervision with the following causal factors 1) lack of weld fusion and penetration and 2) improper pipe fitting used during construction.
Claims an initial report was submitted on February 13, 2012 that details the events and pollutants released during this incident, though LABB does not have this document at this time. The pump was shutdown immediately to minimize and stop the leaking from the discharge piping on the Fractionator Top Pumparound Pump. The refinery's Shift Emergency Response Team was dispatched to the unit to mitigate the release. Firewater monitors were used to knock down the liquid and vapors to prevent a fire. The recommendation (action) from the root cause investigation was to notify the third-party of the conditions of the incident to provide them with the opportunity to investigate and improve their QA/QC.
137005

2012-02-04
Point Source(s):
Unit 259 North Ground Flare (EQT #0282)

Pollutant(s):
Sulfur Dioxide - 8,904 pounds
Cause of Problem: Power Failure

During the Unit 215 Startup on February 4, 2012, the Recycle Gas Scrubber foamed shortly after the lean amine circulation started causing a high level in the Recycle Gas KO Drum, shutting down the Recycle Compressor. Shortly after the Recycle Compressor was re-started, a high temperature wave went through the Train 2 Guard reactor and activated the Train 2 Guard Bed No. 3 bottom catalyst layer rate of change trip initiating a high rate de-pressure via ESD-1. There were no known off-site impacts. On February 4, 2012, 2274 pounds of SO2 were released. On February 5, 2012, 6630 pounds of SO2 were released.
Calculations for SO2 emissions provided in attachments 1A and 1B. LABB was unable to find attachments. The compressor was re-started initially. The Emergency Shutdown (ESD) system activated as designed. An incident investigation was conducted to determine the cause or causes of the incident. Per this investigation, the root causes were identified as 1. procedures wrong- situation not covered and 2. equipment difficulty- design specs need improvement. The recommendations (actions) from the investigation were 1. determine correct Unit 232 operation while Unit 215 is shutdown to ensure that sufficient anti-foam is in the system- completed on 3/19/12; 2. add a step to the unit 215 startup procedure to ensure that Unit 232 is injecting high rates of antifoam at least one hour prior to taking amine- completed 10/1/12; and 3. adjust the ESD logic to increase the temperature at which the rate of change alarms become active - completed 9/19/12. Two incident investigations were conducted to determine the cause or causes of the incident. The first investigation focused on the cause of the electrical failure in Unit 215 which was the origin of the problems in Unit 210. Per this first investigations, the root cause was identified as Equipment difficulty- problem not anticipated. This first investigation had four recommendations (actions) which were 1) have IR windows reinstalled on the 215-1501-A charge pump motor connection box during the next available shutdown- due 8/15/14; 2) Logically "AND" a "50N2T" element to the "RUNNING" element and add it to the trip logic for all 15KV motors that are protected by SEL-710 relays -due 2/29/16; 3) Convert all 15KV connection boxes in service and warehouse stock to include rupture panels - due 8/15/14; and 4) modify standard practice SP-60-27 and SP-60-29 for all induction and synchronous motors to include the requirement for a rupture panel to be installed on the motor connection box- 8/2/12. The second investigation focused on the shutdown of the U210 off-gas compressor, source of the flaring in this incident. Per this investigation, the root causes were identified as 1) Training- understanding needs improvement, 2) Human engineering- human machine interface, 3) communication- no communication or not timely. And 4) Procedures- followed incorrectly. This second investigation had six recommendations (actions ) which were 1) review the need for quickly restarting the compressor with domain 9 operations personnel- completed 3/28/12; 2) Add to board operator training outline a section to review critical actions following the loss of multiple pieces of equipment- completed 6/29/12; 3) raise the priority of the alarm for the suction drum vent valve open to flare from high to urgent- completed 3/29/12; 4) lock the primary alarm summary display on the DCS to sort alarms by priority- completed 3/29/12; 5) review the incident and the need for clear and concise communication during upset conditions with Domain 9 operations personnel- completed 3/28/12; and 6) revise the Unit 210 Off-Gas compressor startup procedure to specify that the board operator loads the compressor and verifies good operation- completed 5/1/12.
136661

2012-01-24
Point Source(s):
Truck Loading Rack Flare Knock Out Drum Pump-out Line

Pollutant(s):
Gas Oil - BRQ
Cause of Problem: Piping or Tubing

There was a release of gas oil from two leaks on a pipe rack west of the cat unit cooling towers. These pipes are part of the Truck Loading Rack Flare Knock Out Drum Pump-out Line. The leak was from the pipe rack west of the cat unit cooling towers, and it was releasing to the ground.
The spill was contained onsite. Vacuum trucks were on the site and in operation. Booms and absorbent pads were being laid out, and the baffle pond was closed to prevent offsite release.
136618

2012-01-20
Point Source(s):
Upper level of Coker Unit

Pollutant(s):
Distillate - 3,081 pounds
Cause of Problem: Piping or Tubing

A tube had a circumferential crack that propagated halfway around one tube in the Distillate Product Fin Fan, 205-1351. Unit 205 GME Delayed Coker (FUG 0053).
The unit was shutdown to minimize and stop the leak. Water monitors were aimed at the leak to suppress vapors. Air monitoring occurred. A vacuum truck, boom, and absorbent pads were used to remove light sheen found in the rain water ditch on the east side of Marathon Avenue adjacent to the unit.
136541

2012-01-14
Point Source(s):
Unit 59 South Flare, Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 220 Thermal Oxidizer, Unit 234 Thermal Oxidizer, and Unit 33 Sour Water Tank

Pollutant(s):
Hydrogen Sulfide - 8 pounds
Sulfur Dioxide - 829 pounds
Nitrogen Dioxide - 88 pounds
Carbon Monoxide - 478 pounds
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) - 1,428 pounds
Particulate Matter 10 - 10 pounds
Particulate Matter - 10 pounds
Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) - 0 pounds
Ammonia - 2 pounds
Cause of Problem: Equipment Failure

Chain of Events: 1/14/12: Hydrocarbon carryover from the Unit 19 Sour Water Stripper caused Unit 220 (sulfur unit) and Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer to trip. As a result, a sulfur dioxide plume was released from the Unit 45 Thermal Oxidizer. During the release, hydrocarbons from the ammonia acid gas header were steamed out to the flare. Units were then shut down to limit environmental impact. 1/15/12: A similar incident took place approximately four hours after Unit 220 startup. During this incident, the flare valve on the fuel gas absorber knockout drum opened to flare to relieve pressure on the drum. Hydrocarbon from the carryover was also sent to the sour water storage tank, which resulted in the tank venting to the atmosphere. 1/16/12: The flare valve from the fuel gas absorber knockout drum was closed at approximately 9:30, and the incident was then determined to be secure. The entire incident is under investigation. Follow up report issued 2/26/2013 summarizes results of internal Marathon investigation.
During the initial upset (1/14/12), Cargill was notified of the plume. All work with the Marathon refinery was put on hold, and the plant's Air Monitoring Team (AMT) was dispatched. The data that they collected is attached to the report. The contents of the Unit 19 Sour Water Storage Tank and ammonia acid gas header were then purged to eliminate existing hydrocarbons. Similar actions were taken to mitigate emissions from the second incident (1/15/12). Units were shut down, the AMT was activated, and fire water was introduced to limit emissions from the sour water tank. This incident was determined to be secured (1/16/12) when the flare valve from the fuel gas absorber knockout drum was closed to the South Flare. An incident investigation was conducted to determine the cause or causes of the incident. Per this investigation, the root cause was identified as Equipment Difficulty-Problem Not Anticipated. The recommendation from this investigation was to review disposition of Fuel Gas Absorber knock-out drum liquid. Report states this action was completed 6/27/12. Only states that SO2 emissions were above reportable quantities.