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Chalmette Refining (1376), Chalmette

Releases of Hydrocarbon

LDEQ Accident Number
Accident Date
Point Source(s) Notes Amount of Release
79331

2005-05-24
No information given
Cause: Leak to cooling tower

Followup: No

Notes: Rescind of notification made based on analyzer data which was disproved by personnel observations or analysis conducted by a third party laboratory.
78980

2005-05-11
K3304
Cause: Leak on the Hydrodesulphurization (HDS) Unit Off0gas Compressor K-3304

Followup: No

Notes: Sweet streams (lower Sulfur content) were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Process unit output was adjusted in order to minimize the total amount of waste gas being sent to the flare. No mention of pollutant other than Nitric Oxide in official report, but attached Summary of Emissions lists multiple pollutants.
251.0 pounds
78361

2005-04-19
K-401 (waste gas compressor number 2)
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401) automatically shut down, automatically diverting waste gas to the flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Low-Sulfur content streams were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Output was adjusted to minimize total amount of waste being sent to the flare. Same language about doing an investigation to understand the underlying cause and prevent future incidents.
12.0 pounds
78341

2005-04-17
K-401 (waste gas compressor number 2)
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401) automatically shut down, automatically diverting waste gas to the flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Low-Sulfur content streams were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Output was adjusted to minimize total amount of waste being sent to the flare.
9.0 pounds
78226

2005-04-13
K-401 (waste gas compressor number 2)
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401) automatically shut down, automatically diverting waste gas to the flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Low-Sulfur content streams were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Output was adjusted to minimize total amount of waste being sent to the flare. Letter rescinds report of nitric oxide because below reportable quantity.
27.0 pounds
78042

2005-04-06
K-402 (Refinery waste gas compressor number 3)
Cause: K-402 unexpectedly shut down. Shortly after shutdown, refinery personnel identified the cause of the shutdown as a malfunction of the compressor motor ignition system.

Followup: No

Notes: The compressor motor was repaired and the compressor restarted, ending the incident.
422.0 pounds
77936

2005-03-31
K-400 (Refinery waste gas compressor number 1)
Cause: Refinery waste gas compressor number 1 (K-400) unexpectedly shut down. Refinery waste gas automatically diverted to the flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Adjustments made to the fuel/air mixture and K-400 restarted.
9.0 pounds
77649

2005-03-16
No information given
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401) automatically shut down due to a high temperature.

Followup: No

Notes: Letter rescinds verbal report because incident was not reportable. No release to atmosphere.
27.0 pounds
77549

2005-03-13
C-2307 (Second Stage High-Pressure Separator) level controller; K-2303 (HCU Second Stage Recycle Compressor)
Cause: During maintenance, the Hydrocracker (HCU) Second Stage High-Pressure Separator (C-2307) level controller was inadvertently left in the manual position. Later, HCU Second Stage Recycle Compressor (K-2303) shut down due to high level in C-2307. Shutdown of K-2303 caused automatic depressurization of C-2307 to the refinery flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Letter rescinds report of Sulfur Dioxide because below reportable quantity.
68.0 pounds
77290

2005-03-02
Waste Gas Compressor Number 4 (K-406); Copper tubing connecting C-435 (first stage suction drum) to high-level instrumentation
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 4 (K-406) shut down due to failure of piece of copper tubing connecting C-435 to high-level shutdown instrumentation. When it failed, a false high level reading was recorded, causing automatic safety shutdown system to become engaged.

Followup: No

Notes: Low-Sulfur content streams were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Output was adjusted to minimize amount sent to the flare. C-435 was retubed, K-406 was checked and restarted.
118.0 pounds
76869

2005-02-11
No information given
Cause: Power failure caused many of the processes to shut down.

Followup: No

Notes:
65.0 pounds
76795

2005-02-07
Unintended over pressurization of the Hydrocracker Light Ends Plant (HCU LEP) Depropanizer surge drum
Cause: Due to the isolation of the sight glass of the hydrocracker light ends plant depropanizer, the automatic level indication equipment was disabled and false reading was transmitted; this condition caused an unintended over pressurization of the HCU LEP Depropanizer surge drum, which was venter to the refinery flare system (No. 2 flare)

Followup: No

Notes: Refinery personnel evaluated the process operation, identified the source of the problem and made appropriate corrections, ending the incident.
345.0 pounds
76775

2005-02-04
Electrical breaker G-457; Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401)
Cause: Electrical breaker for G-457 malfunctioned, unexpectedly cutting power to all pumps and fin-fans within the refinery waste gas compressor area. Waste gas compressor number 2 (K-401) shut down as a result of the electrical power outage and refinery waste gas was diverted to safety flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Low-Sulfur content streams were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Output was adjusted to minimize total amount of waste being sent to the flare. Note: the breaker for G-457 had been identified for repair and was supposed to be replaced that week.
51.0 pounds
76382

2005-01-24
Waste gas compressor shut down and caused an over pressure situation
Cause: Waste gas compressor shut down and an over-pressure situation.

Followup: No

Notes: Rescinding notification for below reportable quantities. (There is a hand-written T76382 on incident # 76355 PDF, but LABB believes that they are unrelated).
24.0 pounds
76355

2005-01-22
K-406 (waste gas compressor number 4)
Cause: Waste gas compressor number 4 (K-406) unexpectedly shut down. Waste gas was automatically diverted to refinery safety flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Rescinding notification for NO2. The refinery waste gas system and refinery operations were adjusted in order to minimize the amount of waste gas being sent to the flare. Sweet streams were routed to the flare in order to minimize sour gas flaring. K-406 was removed from service on 01/27/05 to complete an evaluation of the machine and perform other maintenance. Additional emissions listed in the Summary of Emissions were not mentioned in the report. This incident is related to incident # 76362.(There are two hand-written incident numbers, T76377 & T76382, on the PDF, but LABB believes they are not related to this event).
90.0 pounds
76362

2005-01-21
Hydrocracker Light Ends Plant Butane Splitter Tower & LEP Depropanizer Tower Bottoms Flow Control Valve 50FC060
Cause: (1) 0600 hrs: Hydrocracker Light Ends Plant (LEP) Butane Splitter Tower began to overpressure because LEP Depropanizer Tower Bottoms Flow Control Valve (50FC060) had failed in the open position, letting propane to exit to the Butane Splitter. (2) 1700 hrs: Butane Splitter again began to overpressure due to the presence of propane. The level indication on the level instrument was detecting a false reading.

Followup: No

Notes: Letter speaks of two incidents on same day at 0600 hrs and 1700 hrs but attached report shows three incidents: (1) 4:05 a.m. lasting 3h 42m; (2) 3:15 p.m. lasting 41m; (3) 4:30 p.m. lasting 1h 25m. Amounts of compounds are only given in totals for all 3incidents. This incident is related to incident # 76355. LDEQ states that it is also related to incident # 76395.
199.4 pounds
76224

2005-01-18
No information given
Number 2 Flare -- Pressure Safety Valve (PSV) on Fuel Drum for Number 10 Boiler
Cause: From the verbal report: False pressure indicator on tower, caused relief value to open and gases to mix.

Followup: No

Notes:
856.0 pounds
76033

2005-01-06
K-406 (waste gas compressor number 4)
Cause: K-406 unexpectedly shut down and waste gas was automatically diverted to refinery safety flare system.

Followup: No

Notes: Sweet streams (lower Sulfur content) were routed to the flare to minimize sour gas flaring. Process unit output was adjusted in order to minimize the total amount of waste gas being sent to the flare. Shortly after shutdown, personnel re-started K-406 restoring the systems ability to process available refinery waste gas streams, ending the incident.
9.0 pounds
100878

2007-10-31
Oil/water sewer system
Cause: sewer backed up during heavy rains causing oil inside a pipe to flow to the soil

Followup: No

Notes: DEQ letter states that emission was BRQ of 1000 lbs
914.0 pounds
07-BB005-570

2007-08-02
Ship
Cause: the inspector was trying to carry too many bottles, did not use secondary containment nor properly secure the lid of the bottle after the sample was taken.

Followup: No

Notes: Inspectors on site counseled on ways to prevent a recurrence of the situation.
2.0 pounds
07-BB005-554

2007-07-04
Outfall 210
Cause: pipe connection malfunctioned allowing a small leak to occur

Followup: No

Notes: CRLLC has excavated the area around the leak and isolated the leak in order to make appropriate repairs before placing the line back in service.
1.0 pounds
96288

2007-05-17
Tank # 1014
Cause: back door of vacuum truck failed releasing diesel gasoline mixture as truck attempted to unload to tank 1014

Followup: No

Notes: Truck driver injured when door opened unexpectedly. Letter written to rescind notification of 5/17 concerning release of hydrocarbons and benzene
95913

2007-05-04
No information given
Cause: oil washed up from the sewers due to heavy rainfall

Followup: No

Notes: Letter written to rescind notification of 5/4 concerning release of hydrocarbons. Oil released was recovered and treated within the API separator. Contaminated soil treated for hydrocarbon removal and remaining residue manifested and properly disposed of.
5.0 pounds
111385

2008-12-11
No information given
Cause: No information given

Followup: No

Notes: Letter states that emissions were BRQ.
134923

2011-10-27
Tank 55
Cause: Chalmette Refining provided a courtesy notification to your office regarding a release of hydrocarbon to the atmosphere from the roof of Tank 55 on October 27, 2011. After further review, there were no RQ or permit exceedances as a result of this event.

Followup: No

Notes: No information given.
134930

2011-10-27
Line leak at Tank 68
tank 68
Cause: On October 27, 2011, Chalmette Refinery made a verbal notification that an ongoing combined release from Tank 68 and a retired line in the Treating Area under Incident 11-06603 was resolved, and submitted a follow up letter on October 28, 2011, accordingly. On the morning of October 28, 2011, the retired line was found to be leaking again, potentially in excess of reportable quantities, and notifications were made. The source was isolated at 1500 hours on October 29, 2011, ending the release in excess of a reportable quantity. Cleanup of the area was completed at 1600 hours on Tuesday, November 1, 2011.

Followup: Yes

Notes: Foam was applied to the area, to reduce the emissions from the event. Vacuum trucks were used to recover the benzene and water, and the source was isolated October 29, ending the reportable release. United States Environmental Services was onsite from October 24 to November 1, to assist with cleanup of the area. This accident is linked to 134832. According to LDEQ investigator Lee Lemond, the original accident occurred on a line leak, but the facility thought it was caused due to a tank leak. The facility "repaired the tank" and closed the accident file for 134832. The same leak was later rediscovered as this accident (134930), and it was correctly identified as a line leak. After the second accident report was filed, the line leak was actually repaired.
7,229.0 pounds
134832

2011-10-21
Line leak and Tank 68
Line leak at Tank 68
Tank 68
Cause: Oil was initially discovered in the area of Tank 68 (Alkylate storage)on October 20, 2011. The amount released to the environment was initially estimated to be less that reportable quantities, so no immediate notifications were required. A sample was collected in order to determine the root cause of the leak. On the morning of October 21, liquid was again observed coming from the bottom of the tank, and the lab sample results concurrently confirmed the oil to be alkylate. At approximately 0935 hours on October 21, 2011 a separate incident occurred when a retired line in a ground level piperack in the Treating Area was found to be leaking. The initial amount observed was approximately fourteen gallons of undetermined hydrocarbon, and both emissions and the amount in soil were determined to be less than the reportable quantities. Foam was also applied to the leak areas in order to mitigate odors and emissions. On October 21, 2011, at approximately 1400 hours, oil began accumulating at an increased rate at Tank 68, and it was determined that considering the two releases together, reportable quantities were potentially exceeded for volatile organic compounds (VOC) and benzene, and notifications were made. Several inches of water were introduced into Tank 68 on October 22 to displace the hydrocarbon layer on the tank floor. This ended the hydrocarbon release in excess of a reportable quantity. Additionally, line isolation efforts on the retired line in the Treating Area were performed on October 24, 2011, ending the release in excess of a reportable quantity. Visual observation and monitoring confirmed no ongoing leak to the environment at that time. Cleanup of the area was completed at 1600 hours on Tuesday, November 1, 2011.

Followup: Yes

Notes: Vacuum trucks were used to remove the oil and water from Tank 68, containing the release to the smallest area possible. Mitigation efforts to reduce amount to the environment emissions at Tank 68 also included the introduction of water into the tank to successfully displace the hydrocarbon from the leak interface on Saturday, October 22. The tank was emptied and removed from service on November 7, 2011, ending the release. Cleanup of the area is ongoing. Foam was applied to the area of the line leak, to reduce the emissions from the event. Vacuum trucks were used to recover the hydrocarbon and water, and the line was isolated October 24, ending the reportable release. United States Environmental Services also arrived Monday, October 24 to assist with cleanup of the ares, which was completed November 1, 2011. Tank 68 was cleaned, and initial inspection was performed on December 7, 2011. A repair scope is currently under development, which will implement corrective actions to mitigate corrosion potential for the tank floor.
7,229.0 pounds
134390

2011-10-07
Tank 403 Cam Lock fiting
Tank 71 Floating roof
Cause: Oil was initially discovered on the roof of Tank 71 on August 9, 2011. The emissions were determined to be less than reportable quantities, so no notifications were required. To mitigate leak potential and offsite impacts, the oil was removed daily to prevent accumulation and emissions potential until repair investigation efforts could be completed. On October 7, 2011, at approximately 1040 hours, while cleaning the tank roof to allow for additional inspection, roof scale was dislodged, and a roof leak developed, eventually covering the entire surface area of the tank roof with oil. Foam was applied to the tank roof at 1540 hours, mitigating odors and emissions. Oil was removed from the tank roof October 9, 2011. Though ongoing emissions following removal of the oil are estimated to be below reportable quantities, the tank roof is not floating on the product, thus incident response efforts are still considered in progress, as repairs are completed. At approximately 0915 hours on October 11, 2011 a separate incident at a different tank resulted in hydrocarbon and benzene emissions for approximately 1 hour.

Followup: Yes

Notes: Mitigation efforts to reduce emissions potential commenced promptly, as tank level was reduced, however, the product could not be removed from the tank roof. Foam was applied to the tank roof at 1540 hours,greatly reducing emissions from the event. The tank roof was landed Sunday, October 9, and the oil was able to be removed from the floating roof. Additionally, the tank contents were drained and water was introduced into the tank, however, a thin oil layer remained present as repairs were progressed. Repairs were completed October 14, 2011. Repairs were completed on areas where thickness readings determined necessary on October 14, 2011.
21,085.0 pounds
151351

2013-10-01
Tank Farm, Tank 52
Cause: On October 1, 2013, personnel identified a leak at Tank 52 charge pump (G-9053) which was determined to be from a mechanical seal failure. The valve on the suction side of the pump malfunctioned.

Followup: Yes

Notes: The pump was immediately turned off and the valves on the suction and discharge sides of the pump were closed to attempt to isolate the leak from the pump. The valve on the suctions side of the pump malfunctioned and required the use of water to pressure the hydrocarbon material back to Tank 52 until the line could be isolated. The pump will be repaired and inspected prior to being put back in to service.
180.6 gallons